Yearly Archives: 2019

  1. 5 Holiday Giving Options Offering Healthful Returns

    The Holiday Season is a time for giving, and that includes supporting causes and organizations that make our communities stronger.

    It’s in this spirit that we share some holiday giving suggestions that offer a more healthful return than simply writing a check.

    After all, as physical therapists, it’s our goal to improve lives and the community by helping people move better and live healthier, more active lives.

    It’s based on this that we thought to offer some ideas for how people can give back to their communities while, at the same time, also benefiting from various levels of physical activity.

    Increase Joy, Reduce Stress

    Such an approach to holiday giving isn’t just about contributing to one’s 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week, as recommended by the Department of Health and Human Services.

    The holidays are a pretty stressful time for a lot of people, and exercise is a proven way to reduce stress and anxiety while improving overall happiness. It just so happens giving and volunteering provide similar health benefits.

    Put them together, and you’re likely to experience a more joyful and relaxing holiday season.”

    With this in mind, consider following five ways to give back and be fit this Holiday Season:

    Volunteer ‘Sweat Equity’

    There are lots of ways to volunteer during the holidays, and many involve various levels of physical activity.

    Collecting gift donations for a local children’s charity, for instance, or helping sort and deliver food donations for a food pantry, requires time, muscle and (if it’s a charitable year) good endurance.

    Do a Charity Fun Run

    Running continues to grow in popularity, and so do charity fun runs – even during the colder months of the year.

    Registration for these runs typically goes to local charities, and some allow for added individual or team fundraising so you can maximize your donation.

    Check your local event calendar for options.

    Lend a Neighbor a Hand

    Most of us have neighbors who could use a helping hand on occasion, be they elderly, disabled, alone, or short on time or money.

    The holidays are a great time to check in with them and see if they could use some help with physical tasks like yard work, clearing the driveway of snow or ice, putting out Christmas decorations, or even childcare.

    Walk Your Best Friends

    Are animals your passion? Perfect! Animals need exercise just like people do, and most animal shelters welcome volunteers eager to play with and walk the dogs and cats.

    Not only is walking great exercise for both people and pets, but spending time with animals can also lower stress and blood pressure.

    Arm Your Smartphone

    If the interpersonal aspect of volunteering doesn’t quite fit your personality, you still have options.

    Some smartphone apps exist (Charity Miles is the most prominent) that allow you to convert workout miles and/or daily activity into donations to reputable nonprofit organizations.

    Of course, if one or more of these ideas sound appealing, but discomfort, pain or a movement limitation is holding you back from giving back in this way, come by the physical therapy clinic.

    At our clinic, we can assess the issue and put you on a path toward being more active – both physically and as a contributor to your community.

  2. Can Exercise Ward Off Cold and Flu Symptoms?

    As cold and flu season approaches, so does the season of illness prevention.

    From getting flu shots to adding a little extra Vitamin C to our diets, prevention often becomes a focus for those concerned with getting sick, missing work and/or school, and optimizing the joy of their upcoming Holiday Seasons.

    It’s based on this mindset that medical professionals such as physical therapists are most likely to get some version of the question: Can exercise boost my immune system?

    The answer, however, is broader than the question itself.

    Boosting the Immune System

    On a more general level, healthy living is the true key to building and maintaining a strong immune system. Habits like eating right, staying hydrated, getting plenty of sleep, and reducing stress account for some long-lasting, immune-boosting benefits.

    But, regular exercise definitely plays an important role, as well.

    Some studies have shown, for instance, that exercise on its own can play a role in reducing the length and intensity of colds and flu. Such research often points to many of the benefits inherent in regular fitness routines as factors that also help ward off illness:

    • Weight management
    • Lower blood pressure
    • Reduction in stress
    • Improved circulation

    Other studies have concluded that regular, mild-intensity exercise can help reduce illness while prolonged, high-intensity exercise can have the opposite effect by making one more susceptible to catching a bug.

    Based on this, if you feel you may be catching something – a cold, a flu or whatever may be going around – the best initial advice is to pull back on the length and intensity of their exercise routine just to be on the safe side.

    Keep getting your exercise, but also take greater care to make sure you’re staying hydrated, eating well and giving your body time to recover.

    If you do get sick?

    According to advice from the Mayo Clinic, that doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t continue to exercise. They offer the following two rules of thumb:

    The Neck Rule

    If you catch a cold and find that all the symptoms are concentrated above the neck (i.e., nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing and/or a minor sore throat), it’s typically OK to exercise. Simply reduce your intensity. Instead of going for a jog, for instance, opt to go for a walk.

    In contrast, if you find that you’re experiencing symptoms below the neck – things like a congested chest, a hacking cough or an upset stomach – it’s best to not exercise at all.

    The Fever Rule

    Also, if you have a fever or are experience muscle aches and fatigue throughout your body, take a break from exercising. Instead, get some rest, stay hydrated and, if things don’t improve over a couple of days, visit your doctor.

    The bottom line: it’s always your best bet to listen to your body, and don’t overdo it. Pushing your body too hard when it’s fighting an illness could potentially do you more harm than good.

  3. I Stand Corrected! 5 Common Fitness Myths

    When only one in three adults get the recommended amount of physical activity their bodies need each week (according to the President’s Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition), it’s difficult for we as physical therapists to find fault when an individual is making an effort to exercise … even if the effort’s slightly misguided.

    But since October is National Physical Therapy Month, and physical therapists are the medical community’s preeminent experts in movement, fitness, and musculoskeletal function and injury, we view this month as an opportune time to correct what we see as a few common misconceptions about exercise.

    Good Intentions

    Some of the more common personal goals people make revolve around health, fitness and weight loss, and we as physical therapists are dedicated to supporting these goals through a number of individualized services.

    In doing so, though, it’s important to us that people work toward these objectives in a safe and healthful manner – one which most efficiently moves them toward their goals.

    In this spirit, here are five exercise myths we finds to be common among many fitness-minded people:

    1) Stretching Before Exercise Prevents Injuries

    Perhaps surprisingly, research suggests there’s no connection between pre-workout stretching and injury prevention. In addition, stretching before an activity or competition can actually weaken performance.

    So instead, warm up dynamically before a workout by walking, jogging, doing lunges and leg/arm swings, etc.

    Stretching is still incredibly important, but do your stretches independent of your workouts.

    2) The More, the Better

    For the more goal-driven crowd, a pedal-to-the-metal approach to fitness can seem the quickest and most efficient way to better health.

    However, it’s critical workout intensity and length remain in line with one’s current fitness levels and limits.

    It’s also important to schedule recovery, or off-days, into your routine. Failing to do so can increase your injury risk as well as the risk of burnout.

    3) Cross Training is for Athletes Only

    Cross training is simply working activities into your regimen that differ from your preferred or usual activities. The goal is to improve your overall fitness level by challenging your cardio, strength and balance in different ways.

    Such “training diversification” will help maximize your workout potential while helping to prevent overuse injuries and burnout, so everyone should do it.

    4) Aerobic is More Important Than Strength Training

    Whether it’s because some are concerned about too much “bulking up” or they feel spending their limited time on ellipticals and stationary bikes will maximize their efforts, cardio is often a focus for those seeking to improve health.

    It shouldn’t be the only focus, however.

    Muscular fitness is just as important as cardio for such issues as weight management, bone health, injury prevention, and so on.

    5) If Sore or Injured, Rest is Always Best

    Wrong again.

    While rest has a long history as a go-to response to soreness, pain and injury, research now suggests movement and “active recovery” can actually speed up the healing process, specifically when guided by a physical therapist.

    If pain or injury is keeping you from getting a full dose of exercise and physical activity each week, visit a physical therapist.

    Highly educated and licensed health care professionals, physical therapists like those at our clinic are experts at helping people reduce pain, improve/restore mobility, and ultimately lead more healthful, active lives.

  4. 5 Exercises for Improving Balance & Preventing Falls

    When we’re young, falls are treated as teaching opportunities. “Get back on your feet, brush yourself off and keep moving toward your goals,” we were told.

    But as we age, falls take on a much greater significance. When someone of advanced age falls, they tend to suffer greater distress to their health as well as their pocketbooks.

    In other words, a fall can greatly impact a senior’s ability to live an active, healthful and independent life. In fact, where older adults are concerned, a fall can have a spiraling effect on their overall quality of life during years typically set aside for much-deserved rest, relaxation and fun.

    Unfortunately, though, falls are an epidemic among seniors in the U.S.

    The Fall Epidemic

    According to the National Council on Aging, an older adult is treated for a fall in a U.S. emergency room every 11 seconds, making it the most common cause for nonfatal, trauma-related hospital admissions among this group.

    In addition, the average health care cost for each of these falls is approximately $35,000 per patient.

    Older bodies are simply more susceptible to serious injury when falls occur. And, while there are some things seniors can do to keep their bonds strong and flexible enough to better absorb a fall, the best course of action is to just prevent falls from happening to begin with.

    This starts with improving balance.

    Balance Exercises

    Like strength and cardiovascular conditioning, balance is something that can and should be improved through regular exercise. With this in mind, try these five exercises to help improve your balance:

    Standing March: As the name says, march in place for up to 30 seconds, slowly raising and lowering your knees throughout. Vary the surface on which you march (i.e., hard floor to the back yard) for more of a challenge.

    Heel to Toe: Starting with both heels touching the wall, put one foot in front of the other so the heel touches the toes of the opposite foot. Repeat with the other foot, as if you’re walking a chalk line. Go for 20 steps each round.

    Weight Shifts: With your feet hip-width apart, shift your weight to one side, lifting your other foot off the floor just a few inches. Hold this pose for up to 30 seconds, then shift and hold on the other leg. Increase reps per your ability.

    Single-Leg Balance: Starting with the same stance as above, now left one leg from the floor, banding it back at the knee. Hold for up to 30 seconds, then do the same with the other leg. Increase reps as your balance improves.

    Tai Chi/Yoga: If you feel your balance is strong and you’ve mastered the above exercises, trying a group Tai Chi or yoga class. Such classes are ideal for exercising balance by strengthening your body and core.

    Safety & Physical Therapy

    If you’re new to any of these exercises, help balance yourself initially by leaning on a table, chair back or wall for safety’s sake. Also, make these simple exercises part of your daily routine.

    And, if you’re a senior or soon-to-be senior who doesn’t currently exercise regularly, it’s smart to start any new fall-prevention effort by first getting a balance assessment from a physical therapist.

    Through a balance assessment, a physical therapist can determine your level of functional balance while pinpointing areas of concern that can be addressed through an individualized fall-prevention regimen.

  5. To Stretch or Not to Stretch? Tips for Optimizing Flexibility

    Many have grown up with the understanding that, whenever you’re about to work out, compete or otherwise push your body, it’s important to stretch immediately before the activity in order to prevent injury and perform your best.

    Yet, despite these long-held beliefs – and perhaps surprisingly – there’s little evidence to support this theory.

    Today’s evidence suggests that there’s no connection between injury prevention and stretching – static, or reach-and-hold-type stretching – before a workout. Performance-wise, there’s also no consistent connection, with some studies even suggestions that stretching before an activity or competition can actually weaken performance.

    For example, research released by Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism in 2011 found that the vertical jump heights of young and middle-aged men actually declined when participants stretched beforehand. In contrast, the same study found heights increased after warming up dynamically, or using dynamic stretching.

    Dynamic stretches can best be described as a lower-intensity version of the exercises and movements you plan to perform during your activities or while you’re competing.

    A light jog, some leg swings, lunges, high-knees, arm and shoulder rotations … all these movements can be part of a dynamic stretching routine, depending on the activity you’re about to do.

    Such dynamic warm-ups help you break a sweat, sure, but it does so much more. It ensures your muscles are well-supplied with oxygen, promoting optimal flexibility and efficiency.

    Dynamic stretching, however, can only optimize your current level of flexibility. Static stretching is still vital in maintaining and improving your body’s level of overall flexibility … just not right before an activity.

    So, when’s the ideal time to maintain and improve flexibility through static stretching? Consider the following guidelines:

    Stretch Daily: Just as you should try to get a certain amount of exercise in each day – both cardio and strength training – it’s also important to dedicate 10 to 15 minutes to daily static stretching. Typical static stretches are held for anywhere between 15 to 60 seconds at a time, with each movement repeated two or more times.

    Experts suggest setting time aside for stretching either first-thing in the morning or just before going to bed.

    Stretch During Cool-Downs: Cooling down after an activity helps the body transition from a higher intensity to a resting or near-resting state. While slowed-down exercises (similar to those during dynamic warm-ups) may be included as part of a cool-down, this is also a great time for static stretching.

    As consistent tightness in the muscles and joints can put one more at risk of pain and injury, those who regularly exercise or compete have an annual physical therapy exam. During a PT exam, weaknesses in flexibility, strength and movement can be identified and properly addressed before they manifest into injuries.

  6. 6 Common Back Pain Myths, Debunked

    Despite being one of the top causes of disability in the U.S., affecting around eight in 10 people in their lifetimes, back pain is an ailment often misunderstood by those affected.

    Such misconceptions can cause those suffering from back pain to seek solutions, potential treatment paths, and even lifestyle alterations that aren’t necessarily in their best interests.

    Back pain can be as frustrating as it is debilitating, especially if past preventative measures and treatments haven’t been helpful. And, this can lead a person down paths that don’t result in the best and most necessary evidence-based treatments.

    These paths can sometimes lead to treatments that are more expensive or personally invasive – and perhaps even unnecessary – such as MRIs and surgery.

    MRIs, shots, surgery, medication, etc., should mostly be considered last resort-type solutions. The fact is, most back pain issues will go away on their own in a few days. And even when they don’t, most remaining cases can be successfully resolved through safer, more affordable and more effective treatment approaches.

    To help health care consumers make better decisions when considering solutions to their back-pain issues, we’d like to shed some light on the following common back pain myths:

    1. Bed Rest Helps with Relief & Healing: Once a common treatment for back pain, research strongly suggests long-term rest can slow recovery and even make your back pain worse. Instead, treatment involving movement and exercise (i.e., stretches, walking, swimming, etc.) often works better to hasten healing and provide relief.
    2. The Problem’s in My Spine: Back pain can be caused by a wide array of issues throughout the body as well as one’s environment. It can be a response to the way you move when you exercise, how you sit at work, the shoes you wear, the mattress on which you sleep, or simply your body compensating for movement limitations and weaknesses. Back pain doesn’t necessarily mean you have a “bad back,” or are predisposed to back pain.
    3. I Just Need an ‘Adjustment’: Those accustomed to visiting a chiropractor for back pain issues often claim to find relief from having their spine adjusted, or “cracked.” While this process can release endorphins that offer some temporary relief, only about 10 percent of all back pain cases can actually benefit from spine mobilization. Exercise is often more effective, as is determining and treating the pain’s source. (See item No. 2.)
    4. Medication’s the Answer: A popular quick fix, medication should never be viewed as a long-term solution to chronic back pain issues. Over-the-counter pain relievers can help get you through in the short term, but many prescription pain meds can be dangerous, addictive, and even make the pain worse in some instances.
    5. I’ll Probably Need Surgery: Of people experiencing low-back pain, only about 4 to 8 percent of their conditions can and should be successfully treated with surgery, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Even 90-plus percent of herniated discs often get better on their own through a combination of rest and physical therapy.
    6. I Need a Referral to See a Physical Therapist: Multiple studies have concluded that physical therapy is one of the safest and most effective ways to both treat and prevent back pain. And in nearly every state, patients can access physical therapy services without first getting a physician’s prescription.

Central/Valley View

Hours:
Monday – Thursday 7:00 am – 5:00 pm
Friday 7:00 am – 12:00 pm
*Spanish-speaking Therapist

Physical Therapy Treatment and Services:

  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Corporate Fitness Programs
  • Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Functional Capacity Evaluations
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Orthotics
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
  • POETs
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Rehabilitation
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation

Clinician Bios

Kimberly J. Bozart-Dow, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS

Kimberly has over 15 years of clinical experience and earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Science, with a minor in Psychology from the University of Southern California. She went on to receive her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of Southern California. Dr. Bozart-Dow is also a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC) and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). Dr. Bozart-Dow has experience working with elite and professional athletes at all levels. She has served as the Head Athletic Trainer and Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Los Angeles Amazons, a team of the Women’s Professional Football League (WPFL). She has been a PT for the 2008 US Diving Olympic Trials, a PT for the 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games in Los Angeles, and currently serves as a Team USA physical therapist for the U.S. Figure Skating Association. Dr. Bozart-Dow is a California native who is active and enjoys watching ALL sports. She enjoys snowboarding/skiing, spending time on the lake, international travel, and spending quality time with her husband and watching her daughter in college play NCAA Division I volleyball!

Berne Leavitt, PT, MSPT

Berne graduated with honors from the University of Utah in 1987, having more than 30 years of diverse experiences. Berne likes the challenges of working with post-surgical or orthopedic patients. In his spare time, Berne enjoys hiking, biking and working in his yard. Berne and his wife Jan are the proud parents of 6 children and 14 grandchildren. Berne’s favorite thing about physical therapy treatment is the personal interaction he has daily with patients.

Robert Wolinsky, MA, PT

Rob has been practicing physical therapy in Las Vegas since 1984. He graduated from Stanford University with a Master’s Degree in physical therapy and specializes in orthopedics. As a bilingual practitioner, Rob enjoys his ability to cater to a diverse population and provide the best physical therapy services to anyone who needs it. Drumming and playing soccer are some of the ways he also likes to occupy his time.

 

Steve Rhodes, PTA

Steve is a 30 year resident of Las Vegas. He graduated from The Community College of Southern Nevada in 1994. He has worked in various therapy environments but prefers outpatient Orthopedics. He thoroughly loves helping people feel better and achieve more through physical therapy and rehabilitation. Steve is also fluent in Spanish.

 

Andrew Fenton, PTA

Andrew is originally from Iowa and has lived in Las Vegas since 2015. He earned his PTA degree in 2017 from Pima Medical Institute. He was a Sergeant in the Army and served for 6 1/2 years before entering the service he earned an AA in automotive mechanics. He enjoys watching college football – GO HAWKEYES – and the Las Vegas Golden Knights.

 

Barbara Pawelek, PTA

Barbara was born and raised in Poland.  She moved to Illinois in 2004, where she graduated from Fox College with a degree in Physical Therapist Assistant.  She gained her experience working in a variety of settings including skilled nursing and outpatient.  She moved to Las Vegas in 2017 where she joined Kelly Hawkins Physical Therapy.  In her spare time, Barbara enjoys hiking, cooking, watching movies and spending time with her husband and a dog.

Marlon Calusin, B.Sc. Kinesiology

Marlon has been an invaluable member of the Kelly Hawkins Physical Therapy management team for over 13 years, performing FCEs; Ergo Evals and Job Task Analyses. He is originally from Vancouver, British Columbia and obtained his Kinesiology Degree from Simon Fraser University. He started his career with F.A.I.R. Assessments Centers doing a pilot project with Worksafe BC (formerly Workers’ Compensation Board of BC), working with physical therapists, occupational therapists and medical doctors for the Permanent Functional Impairment Evaluations (PFI) Program. He became the Designated Trainer for the clinicians performing PFI evaluations. Marlon also performed Physical Demands Analyses/Job Task Analyses, Ergonomic Evaluations and Functional Capacity Evaluations before moving to Las Vegas. When not at work, you’ll find him outdoors either working in his garden or enjoying walks and hiking activities with his wife.

Northwest/Summerlin

Hours:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
*Spanish-speaking Therapist

Prevention and Rehabilitation Physical Therapy Services

  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Orthotics
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Wound Care

Clinician Bios

Keith Lamping, PT, DPT

Keith was born and raised in Dayton, Ohio. He graduated from Vandalia-Butler High School where played several sports including Football, Baseball, and ran track. Keith entered The Ohio State University on a full academic scholarship and received his Bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry. He then went on to the University of Dayton to complete his Doctorate in Physical therapy. Keith practiced in Dayton, Ohio and became the sports and neuro specialist at the clinic where he saw a wide range of patients from professional athletes to those recovering from a stroke. Keith’s specialties include work-related injuries, orthopedic care (pre-op and post-op), balance training, lymphedema, and sports. Keith is currently in the process to receive his OCS, Orthopedic certified specialist.

Ashlie Purtell-Hill, PT, DPT

Ashlie was born and raised in Reno, NV where she attended undergrad at UNR.  During all 4 years of her undergrad, she was a cheerleader for the University of Nevada, Reno.  She obtained her doctorate of physical therapy from UNLV and graduated in 2009. She has worked in a variety of settings including PT rehab, acute, and outpatient.  She was a traveler PT and worked in California and Illinois before returning back to Nevada in 2015.  Ashlie has an 8-month-old daughter and her husband is also a physical therapist. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her family, cooking and traveling.

Sara Bookout, PT, DPT

Sara recently graduated with a Doctorate of Physical Therapy from UNLV. She is from the Vegas Valley and recently completed research in the Acute care hospital setting. Sara has a history of working with both the pediatric and geriatric population in PT rehab. She also enjoys volunteering for organizations that encourage children to participate in sports and physical activities. In her spare time, Sara enjoys traveling, watching football, attending Zumba classes, and spending time with her husband and family.

Kelcie Leeming, PTA

Kelcie was born and raised in Las Vegas, NV and obtained her Physical Therapy Assistant license at Carrington College in June of 2016. She has been working as a PTA in an out-patient physical therapy setting since graduating. Kelcie has also been certified in athletic and Kinesio taping since graduating. In her spare time, Kelcie enjoys spending time with her family and playing soccer and sand volleyball.

Southwest/Russell

Hours:
Monday – Thursday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday 7:00 am – 12:00 pm
*Spanish-speaking, Tagalog-speaking & German-speaking Therapists

Services

  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Orthotics
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Rehabilitation
  • Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD)
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Wound Care

Clinician Bios

Bill Chynoweth, PT

Bill is originally from Orem, Utah and obtained his physical therapy degree from the University of Utah. He has been practicing physical therapy for over 30 years in private practice. Bill has a long history of working with athletes, including training boxers, TMJ treatment and has a personal commitment to provide the highest quality rehab physical therapy treatment through dedication, professionalism, teamwork, and love of this great work. In his spare time, Bill enjoys running, hunting and spending time with his wife and family.

Craig Perry, PT, DPT

Craig is originally from South Jordan Utah. He attended Utah State University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in exercise science. He then went on to earn his Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from UNLV. He is level 1 and 2 certified in Fascial Movement Taping and is currently working towards a certification in Functional Movement Screening. Prior to earning his degrees, he spent two years teaching and serving for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the Dominican Republic. In his free time Craig loves to spend time with his wife and three children.

Adam Carrillo, PT, DPT, CSCS

Dr. Adam Carrillo was born in Mt. Shasta, California and has resided in Southern Oregon as well as Southern California. He graduated with honors from California State University, Chico with a BS in Exercise Physiology.

Dr. Carrillo received his Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of St. Augustine in San Marcos, California. The University of St. Augustine’s comprehensive curriculum provided him with a strong background in physical rehabilitation of various patient populations with an emphasis in orthopedic and manual physical therapy.

Since starting his career with Kelly Hawkins, Dr. Carrillo has continued to expand his practice by becoming a certified Level 1 Functional Dry Needling Practitioner for Pain Management and Sports Injuries and a Certified Kinesiotape provider in Fascial Movement Taping Level 1 & 2. Following his passion of bodybuilding and athletics, Dr. Carrillo has recently become certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and enjoys assisting others preparing for bodybuilding and sports competitions.

Dr. Carrillo’s current career goals are to continue his education with clinical specializations to become an Orthopedic Clinical Specialist (OCS) as well as a Sports Clinical Specialist (SCS). He hopes to continue expanding his practice and integrate his passion for health and fitness with his therapeutic interventions to all his patients.

Brendon Aitken, PT, DPT

Brendon was born and raised in South Africa. He moved to the US in 2009 to attend college as well as play collegiate rugby at Arkansas State University. He graduated in 2013 with a Bachelor of Exercise Science degree and then attended Physical Therapy school at Arkansas State University. In 2016, Brendon obtained a Doctorate of Physical Therapy and has been working in the outpatient physical therapy orthopedic setting since graduation. He recently moved to Las Vegas from Baton Rouge, LA and is passionate about treating all orthopedic patients. With his athletic background, he also has a passion for treating athletes.

Kourtni Seech, PTA

Kourtni is a Las Vegas native and graduated from Pima Medical Institute. She has worked at many physical therapy places as a PTA since 2014 and was a Physical Therapist Tech for 6 years prior. In her free time, she likes to travel and hang out with friends.

 

Hours:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Orthotics
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
 

  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine Rehab
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Wound Care

When you visit a physical therapist in Henderson, NV they will help create an individualized service plan thats right for you.

Clinician Bios

 Austin Hill, PT, DPT (Clinic Director)

Austin is a Las Vegas native and he received his Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Midwestern University in Chicago, IL in 2015. Austin played football in college at Southern Utah University where he suffered injuries that required surgery on his shoulder and knee. These experiences helped him to relate to his patients since he has been through the pain of surgery and the recovery process. He knows from personal experience that with adherence to the proper rehab program, patients can return to their prior level of function. Austin enjoys working with all types of patients in the outpatient orthopedic setting. In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his wife and daughter and also has a love for sports.

Rachel Bagay, PTA

Rachel was born and raised in Maui.  She graduated from Pima Medical Institute in 2014 with a degree in Physical Therapist Assistant. She has been working in her chosen profession for over three years and has helped numerous patients return to a healthy active lifestyle. When she is not working with patients, she enjoys spending time with her family.

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East/Flamingo

Hours:
Monday – Thursday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday 7:00 am – 5:30pm
*Spanish-speaking Therapist

Physical Therapy Services

  • Blood Flow Restriction Training
  • Corporate Fitness Programs
  • Dry Needling
  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Fall Prevention Training
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
 

  • Pelvic Health (external only)
  • Pre-Surgical Prehab
  • Post-Surgical Rehab
  • Spine Rehab
  • Sports Medicine Rehabilitation
  • Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD)
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Wound Care

Clinician Bios

Daniel Sandberg, PT, DPT, Clinic Director

Daniel was born and raised in Washington State. He graduated from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah with a Bachelor of Science in Dietetics. Before being admitted into physical therapy school, he received a certification as a Diet Technician Registered and worked as a Professional Ski Instructor and Physical Therapy Aide in Seattle, Washington and Orange County, California. He went on to receive a Doctor of Physical Therapy from the Medical University of South Carolina in beautiful Charleston, South Carolina in May of 2017. During his time in school he acted as class Vice-President, worked as an Anatomy and Physiology supplemental instructor, volunteered with a spinal cord injury water ski clinic and wheelchair basketball tournaments, and completed clinical affiliations in a skilled nursing facility in Salt Lake City, an acute care hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, and two orthopedic/sports affiliations with one in South Carolina and the other in New York City. Daniel has a passion for amazing food, the outdoors, skiing, athletics, continued education, traveling, and providing excellent care with his patients.

Kristin Luebke, PT, DPT

Kristin was born and raised in Minnesota. She graduated from Minnesota State University Mankato in 2012 with honors with a BS in Human Biology and a BA in Chemistry and Spanish. In 2017 she received her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Midwestern University in Downers Grove IL. Since starting her career as a physical therapist, she has experience as a travel PT, along with outpatient orthopedics. Kristin is very passionate with health and fitness, volunteering with kid’s ministries and spending time with family. Her and her fiancé have two cats and have recently moved to Las Vegas, NV from St. Paul, MN. She is excited to make NV her home and to continue serving those within the community.

Camille Marrero Mangual, PTA

Camille was born and raised in Puerto Rico. Her passion for dance led her to UMass Amherst University where she majored in dance until 2009 and decided to move back home immediately after. In 2013 she moved to Las Vegas, NV by herself where she continued training non-professionally and witnessed friends and acquaintances getting injured and putting a pause to their career, which sparked her to return to school to become a Physical Therapist Assistant in order to be of help to the dance community. She was admitted to Pima Medical Institute PTA program in 2017. During her clinical rotations in outpatient orthopedics she grew a passion to help the general public to assist them to return to their previous functional state and get back to enjoying what they love. Camille recently graduated from Pima Medical Institute in February 2019 and is dedicated to providing fine patient care and continued education. She loves to learn from different cultures and has a mission to travel the world and experience the beauty the world has to offer.

Chris Cadiz, PTA, PES, CES

Chris was born and raised in St. Louis, MO where he attended St. Louis Community College to receive his Associates in Applied Science to become a Physical Therapist Assistant. Before becoming a Vegas resident in 2018, Chris had visited Vegas every year since he graduated back in May of 2012 and made the decision to finally make the move. In his spare time, he loves to train and do Physique competitions. He is a firm believer in taking care of ones self in order to take care of others. Other hobbies include playing baccarat and poker. Anyone that knows him would describe him as a positive, energetic, and personable guy. Chris loves treating a wide variety of patient populations to keep growing as a clinician and learning new techniques to help patients get better. To improve athletic performance and to correct imbalances of patients with postural dysfunction, he is a Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES) and Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES) through the National Academy of Sports Medicine.

Centennial Hills

Hours:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
*Spanish-speaking Therapist

Services

  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Orthotics
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
 

  • POETs
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine Rehab
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Wound Care

Clinician Bios

Cody Okuda, PT, MSPT, Cert. MDT

Cody was born and raised in Las Vegas, Nevada. He graduated from UNLV with a Bachelors degree in Kinesiology (2001)  and a Masters in Physical Therapy(2003). He became a Certified Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapies (Cert. MDT) practitioner in 2019. He played baseball for UNLV and was awarded the team MVP in 2000 and also was also named to the Mountain West Academic All-Conference Team. Before transferring to UNLV he played both soccer and baseball for Yavapai College and was part of the 1997 national championship soccer team. Previous to that he served a 2-year mission for his church in Donetsk, Ukraine. At Chaparral he was fortunate to be part of the 1993 high school state championship soccer team that was ranked 3rd in the country by USA Today and the 1992 American legion baseball state championship team. He was an all state selection for both soccer and baseball and was given the 1993 high school Gatorade Player of the Year award for soccer in the state of Nevada. Cody’s favorite activities are spending quality time with his wife, Austin and their 7 children.

Cody has worked with professional athletes and performers from around the world. He specializes in back and neck disorders and the rehabilitation of injuries of the extremities including returning athletes to throwing activity.

 

Meagan Duncan, PTA

Meagan Duncan is a Chicagoland native that moved to Las Vegas in 2017 to earn her Doctorate in Physical Therapy at University of Nevada Las Vegas (2020). Before going on the earn her doctorate, she was a Physical Therapist Assistant in Illinois and then Nevada with an Associate’s Degree from Kankakee Community College (2013), and a Bachelor’s in Interdisciplinary Studies from Governor’s State University (2016). After working one year as a PTA she realized what a privilege it is to love the work you do every day and knew she had to go on for a doctorate in the field. She has enjoyed working in orthopedic settings and underserved communities, developing and running a pro bono clinic in her home town of Joliet, IL. While attending UNLV she took several specialty courses in orthopedic conditions as well as pelvic floor physical therapy, and did a pelvic floor specialty clinical affiliation with Veteran Affairs of Southern Nevada and now serves another area of great need: Women’s Health and Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation. She is passionate about developing strong patient relationships and helping those with issues that can otherwise be difficult to talk about and treat. Meagan enjoys traveling, hiking, camping, and paddle boarding with her dog and husband, and misses Chicago pizza but not Chicago winters!

 

Amber Stetka, PTA

Amber was born and raised in Las Vegas, NV. She attended and graduated high school from Calvary Chapel Christian School where she won a Nevada state championship in track. She completed a Bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology at UNLV and earned her Physical Therapist’s Assistant

Heather Fox, PT, DPT

Alejandro Preciado, PT, DPT

Hagen Smith, PTA, LMT

Northeast/Bonanza

Hours:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday 7:00 am – 12:00 pm
*Spanish-speaking Therapist

Services at our Physical Therapy Center

  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Orthotics
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
 

  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Wound Care

Clinician Bios

Mutya O’Boyle, PT, DPT

Mutya attended the University of Washington, in her hometown of Seattle, where she received her Bachelor’s degree. She continued her educational training at Regis University in Denver, CO earning her Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree in 2009. Mutya enjoys working with all patients with orthopedic or neurological deficits. She has taken several continuing education courses that have emphasized manual therapy, movement correction, and incorporation of unique exercises to return patients to their prior level of function. Aside from her passion for health care and physical therapy, Mutya enjoys spending time with her family and trying new restaurants.

Melissa Flores, PTA

My name is Melissa Flores and I am a Physical Therapist Assistant at Kelly Hawkins Physical Therapy. I’m from Oxnard, California and moved to Henderson, Nevada with my family when I was 12 years old. My favorite things among many include family, sports, and food. Basketball is my favorite sport and I hope to one day have the opportunity to watch the Duke Men’s Blue Devils play at home in Camden Stadium with a frontrow seat next to Coach K (most definitely on my bucket list). I graduated from Fresno Pacific University with a B.A in Kinesiology in 2010, and from Carrington College with an A.S Physical Therapist Assistant in 2017.  I initially discovered my passion for physical therapy following a seasonending knee injury as a collegiate athlete in 2008. My ninemonth recovery was challenging but also a blessing in disguise. My experience and appreciation for the therapists and staff had such an impact and transformed my life forever. I consider myself privileged to have the opportunity to help others improve their quality of life every single day.

Timothy Hipkins, PTA

Tim has 20 years of experience in physical therapy, primarily out-patient orthopedic. Tim is well versed in many different manual therapy techniques as well as generalized sports nutrition. He has been with Kelly Hawkins for 7 years.

North Las Vegas/Ann Road

Hours:
Monday – Thursday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday 7:00 am – 12:00 pm
*Spanish-speaking Therapist

Physical Therapist Services

  • Egoscue
  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Industrial Rehabilitation
  • Manual Physical Therapy
  • Orthopedic Rehabilitation
  • Orthotics
  • Pediatric Orthopedic Physical Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine Rehab
  • Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD)
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Workers’ Compensation
  • Wound Care

Clinician Bios

Jeffrey Hill, PT

Jeff has been practicing for over 25 years, all with Kelly Hawkins Physical Therapy Offices. He graduated from Northwestern University in Chicago in 1989 with a degree in physical therapy. He has assumed many roles throughout the years including clinical director and chief operating officer. Jeff employs the long-standing philosophy that Kelly Hawkins himself implemented 40 years ago, “We treat every patient like they are family”. Jeff is fluent in Spanish. His specialties include TMJ, foot and ankle injuries, all orthopedic/sports injuries, work-related injuries, and chronic pain. In his spare time, Jeff is an avid golfer, enjoys motorcycles and loves to go on camping and 4-wheeler trips to the mountains and sand dunes with his wife and family.

Ciera Cortney, DPT

Ciera is a Las Vegas native who graduated in May 2017 from the University of Nevada Las Vegas, with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. She discovered her passion for this field as a Division I athlete at Boise State University, where she saw numerous sports-related injuries in which physical therapy was able to allow athletes back into action and improve their performance as well.

Furthering her physical therapy knowledge, she has participated in several research studies conducted at UNLV. Her research, in collaboration with UNLV students and faculty, discussed physical therapists’ effect on hospital readmission. This article is expected to be published in the near future. Ciera enjoys spending time with family, being outdoors, and loves to participate in races. Her most recent competition completed was a triathlon. She enjoys working with people of all ages and provides evidence-based treatment with each patient.

Steve Pace, PTA

Steve is a proud native of Las Vegas. He graduated from UNLV with a B.S. degree in Kinesiology. While attending school, he worked for Kelly Hawkins as a Physical Therapy Tech and assisted with Functional Capacity Evaluations (FCEs) for 4 years. He received his A.S. degree from Carrington College in 2016 and began working as a PTA at the Ann Road clinic shortly thereafter. Steve enjoys working with a variety of patients and helping improve their quality of life. In his spare time, Steve enjoys spending time with his wife and 2 young boys. He also enjoys attending a variety of sporting events, especially UNLV basketball.